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The Dead Sea Scrolls

fragments of dead sea scrolls

handout photos of dead sea scrolls provided by the Israeli Antiquities Authority

Map of dead sea
map of dead sea area

The Dead Sea scrolls is a set of around 900 documents, including texts from the Hebrew Bible, found in and around eleven caves in the Wadi Qumran near the ruins of the ancient settlement of Khirbet Qumran, discovered between 1947 and 1956 , on the northwest shore of the Dead Sea. The dead sea scrolls manuscripts generally date between 150 BCE to 70 CE.

The texts are having great religious and historical significance, as they include some of the surviving copies of Biblical documents made before 100 BCE, within late Second Temple Judaism. They are written in Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek, mostly on parchment, Being written in papyrs they are fragile, of immensive historical value.

Some facts about dead sea scrolls
Dead sea scrolls authors : an ascetic and celibate Jewish community known as the Essenes.

who found the dead sea scrolls:5 by Beduin; 6 by archaeologists

Significance of dead sea scrolls:enhance our knowledge of both Judaism and Christianity.

dead sea scrolls translation,
Background information on the Dead Sea Scrolls, and images of those fragments and artifacts displayed at the Library of Congress exhibit.
http://sunsite.unc.edu/expo/deadsea.scrolls.exhibit/intro.html

read the dead sea scrolls
To read view of the dead sea scrolls visit here


* Dead Sea Scroll

image of dead sea scroll


* Excavation at Qumran community caves where dead sea scrolls found

excavation is still going on in various places for sacred dead sea scrolls


* Qumran caves at wilderness

The Scrolls Cave where dead sea scrolls found



* Qumran caves where dead sea scrolls found. Bedouins discovered this
cave in August 1952, resulted in finding fourteen thousand fragments
of sacred dead sea scrolls from dead sea dust. Archaeologists, who
reached the cave later, uncovered an additional 1,000 fragments with
excavation and searching. It is believed as per scholars that a Roman
soldier who entered the cave in 68 CE tore the scrolls intentionally,
and later damages caused by by animals and climate inflicted damages.
In the research proceeded, the fragments of these scrolls were fixed
together to produce around 530 different scrolls. Publication of these
scrolls was finally completed in 2001.



* Images courtesy Flickr.com and its vibrant members

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